Posts Tagged ‘artist’

lee jeffries

I luckily stumbled upon this amazing Lee Jeffries photo pictured above. I have always thought there was something supremely beautiful and classic about black and white photography. So, as a huge fan of this format I was instantly drawn to this image.

Lee Jeffries photographic journey began with a chance meeting with a young homeless girl in the streets of London. In 2008, the photographer was in London to run a marathon, and a day before the race he decided to wander the city to take pictures. This is when he aimed and focused his lens on a young, homeless woman.  His actions were not warmly welcomed by the girl and she began shouting at him. But instead of just taking off, Jeffries chose to apologize for his perceived intrusion. The 18 year old then proceeded to share her story with him. After this encounter Jeffries about the homeless completely changes.

Going forward he didn’t want to exploit these people or steal photographs of them. He also made sure he got to know his subjects prior to or while shooting them. Jeffries says, “I need to see some kind of emotion in my subjects. I specifically look at people’s eyes—when I see it, I recognize it and feel it—and I repeat the process over and over again.” He tried to keep the contact as informal as possible by rarely taking notes, and prefers to take pictures while he is talking with his subjects to capture the “real emotion” in them.

Self-taught and self-funded, Jeffries has used vacation time to travel to Skid Row in Los Angeles three times, as well as Las Vegas, New York, London, Paris and Rome, to continue his project. He uses his photography to draw attention to and raise funds for the homeless, posting the images to Flickr and entering the work into competitions. The proceeds from Jeffries’s Blurb book, which features homeless portraits, go to the Union Rescue Mission in Los Angeles and the photographer allows any charity to use his images free of charge.

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An Artistic Friend, Alanna Vanacore

These works below belong to 25 year old Alanna Vanacore, a friend of mine from my hometown Ormond Beach, Florida. I first discovered her talented pieces through her Facebook and Instagram page. She recently relocated to Brooklyn, New York to pursue her artistic dreams further. Her love of art began as a child due largely in part to her mother being a painter also. She says she used acrylics at the early age of 6. Today Alanna mainly uses graphite and charcoal for her drawings, and oils and acrylics for her paintings. Some her favorite artists include: Jenny Saville, John Currin, Egon Schiele, and Lucian Freud.

My previous art oriented posts were mainly centered around artists and their ability to make their art look realistic, also known as photo-realism. Alexa Meade,  however does the contrary. She seeks to make three-dimensional subjects look like two-dimensional oil paintings when viewed in a photograph.

In August 2008, the artist began to apply acrylic paint to the surfaces of people, objects, and walls in a broad brushstroke that mimics the appearance of brushwork in a painting. After 9 months of practice, she was able to unveil her “Reverse Trompe L’Oeil” collection in October, 2009. Her aim is to make her living models into flat pictures. The result is walking, talking optical illusions that confuse how the eye processes these objects in space.

The artist never attended art school nor has she ever taken advanced painting courses.

The following are some of her works, are you deceived? Alexa Meade paints on the surfaces of live human subjects, found objects, and architectural spaces in a way that optically compresses 3D space into a 2D plane when photographed.

Alexa Meade art

 

These are the artistic creations of a 22 year old Italian artist named Diego Fazio. He’s found a way to create photo-realistic drawings using a simple charcoal pencil.

It’s so unbelievably realistic that he had to put up some photos of the work in progress just to quiet the doubters on the authenticity of his work. I can’t blame them, heck I wanted proof myself, ha.

Diego is a self-taught pencil master. He started out as a tattoo artist, and developed a passion for creating photo-realistic drawings. Inspired by the works of Japanese artists from the Edo period, like Katsushika Hokusai, he managed to capture people’s imaginations with his precise lines and oriental drawing techniques.

Scroll down for a few of his drawings and/or check out his Deviant Art profile, as well.

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